Saturday, April 30, 2016

Area Death

Dr. Michael Gene Morrow, 67, pastor of Union Baptist Church in Marion died Friday at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington. Myers Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Place print classified online

Yard Sale?
Need to get rid of some stuff?
Have a car to sell?

Press Classifieds are a sure-bet way to move the items you have for sale and Spring is a great time to think about getting rid of some of that stuff.

Place your ad right from your computer.



Rain washes out jamboree

Today's little league softball jamboree at Marion-Crittenden County Park is cancelled due to rain.

There will be no makeup date.



Friday, April 29, 2016

Not over yet: 1 day to vote

MARION IS CLOSE TO GETTING A FREE CONCERT, but needs votes before tomorrow's deadline.


To win, Marion needs to retake the spot vote in online voting. Follow the link below from the original post to help Marion win this contest and earn a free concert.


ORIGINAL POST --------------------------

Marion competing for free concert 

Social media entrepreneur Jonathan Burdon thinks his hometown can earn a free concert by an up-and-coming country band. All it will take is a few clicks.

Burdon, formerly of Marion, now lives in Nashville where he manages a social media platform known as Social Coaster. Through his network in Tennessee, Burdon has become friends with RJ Romeo, a well-known figure in the country music business. Romeo is launching a new product called VibeRoom which allows fans to essentially create demand for an act within a certain area of the country – which in turn creates opportunities for locations that normally wouldn't attract big-name artists.

“He is currently running an alpha test of his product,” Burdon said. “To test the theory, he has partnered with LoCash (formally LowCash Cowboys) to run a contest where one city can get a free concert.

Burdon
“I have asked him to add Marion because I have a theory that a smaller town can pull together enough votes and beat the larger markets,” Burdon said.

On a smartphone, tablet or computer, Marion supporters can go online to the LoCash.viberoom.us and quickly vote for their hometown.

“The more people share and spread the word, the greater the chance of winning, Burdon explained.

The contest ends Apr. 30.

"Marion, Kentucky is my home, I love this place. Being in a rural area can often limit us from hosting major musical acts. That is why I was  really excited when VibeRoom agreed to include us in their contest,” Burdon said. “Based on what I have seen thus far with the contest, I really think Marion has a great shot of winning if everyone takes a second to vote and encourages their friends to vote. It would be an amazing opportunity to bring a nationally known act like LoCash to our town for a free concert.”

Let us take care of Dinner

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Download, Share, View, Print

PHOTOS FROM THURSDAY'S PERFORMANCE

CCMS PRINCIPAL SURVEY


CCMS PRINCIPAL SELECTION CRITERIA SURVEY

CCMS Parents and Community,
The local school district is asking residents to click on the following link to complete a 5 minute survey that will inform the CCMS Principal Selection Committee of the criteria that they feel is most important. This committee which consists of SBDM members and the superintendent will review results of the survey on Wednesday, May 4 at 4pm. The link will close at 8am May 4.  CLICK HERE

Best Pizza in Town

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Absentee voting open in county

In-person absentee voting for the May 17 primary will continue in County Clerk Carolyn Byford's office until 4 p.m. May 16. To vote on the absentee machine, you must be unable to vote at your polling location on Election Day. Polls that day are open between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.

Bookkeeper wanted


Elk permit app deadline tomorrow

Hunters interested in entering this year’s elk hunt quota have until 11 p.m., Saturday to buy applications. Hunters can apply online at the department’s website, fw.ky.gov.

Kentucky residents and non-residents are eligible to apply for four permit types but can only be drawn for one. Each application costs $10.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife will issue 900 general quota hunt permits and 10 youth permits this year through a random computer drawing conducted in early May by the Kentucky Commonwealth Office of Technology. Results will be available to applicants on the department’s website May 13.

Eighty-four percent of bull elk hunters using a gun last year enjoyed a successful hunt and 74 percent of hunters utilizing archery equipment successfully harvested a bull. The success rate for cow archery hunters was 32 percent last year and 68 percent among hunters using a firearm for cow elk.

“Our herd dynamics have changed in recent years,” said Gabe Jenkins, deer and elk program coordinator with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, “Hunters will have to work to be successful and time spent scouting will greatly increase chances for success.”

The season limit of 250 bulls and 650 cow elk is unchanged from last year, as is the allotment among tag types.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife will issue 150 firearms permits and 100 archery/crossbow permits for bulls; 390 firearms permits and 260 archery/crossbow permits for cow elk.

Demand is greatest for the bull firearms permit and lowest for the cow archery hunts.

The bull archery/crossbow season opens in September. The bull elk firearms seasons are spread over two separate, weeklong hunts in October while the cow elk firearms seasons are split into two weeklong hunts, one in December and one in January.

Hunters ages 15 and younger can apply for the youth-only quota hunt during the same application period as the general elk quota hunt drawing. They may also apply for the general quota elk hunt drawing, but cannot be drawn for both in the same year.

A landmark restoration effort re-established an elk herd in the state’s scenic southeastern region and created one of the most sought-after hunting opportunities east of the Rocky Mountains. Kentucky’s elk herd is the largest east of the Rocky Mountains and more than all the states east of the Mississippi River combined. The elk restoration zone in southeast Kentucky covers 16 counties and more than 4 million acres.

KSP: Consequences of sexting can last lifetime

Kentucky State Trooper Stu Recke talks recently to students in Carol West’s high
school language arts class about the serious legal consequences of sexting.

THE CRITTENDEN PRESS
What may be intended as a playful – but explicit – flirt between teenagers can haunt those people the rest of their lives, Kentucky State Police warned students recently.

Sexting between the smartphones of minors is a serious issue in the Commonwealth that can compromise the welfare and reputation of the ones who exchange or possess pornographic images of minors. And just because you are under 18 doesn’t exempt you from the felony sex offense, Trooper Stu Recke told students.

Recke, the public affairs officer for Post 2 in Madisonville, and Post Detective Lloyd Ray delivered their warning to more than 600 middle and high schoolers earlier this month at the request of school officials. High school Principal Curtis Brown, sitting in on the presentations, said he felt the message rang loud enough to cause teens to rethink sexting and perhaps even prompt a few to delete any racy photos they may have on their device.

“Don’t do it,” Recke told students. “One stupid mistake can cost you.”

The trooper explained that a teen snapping an explicit photo of themselves or another individual and delivering it digitally to someone else can constitute three felony offenses punishable by one to five years each.

“You’ve broken the law three times,” he said. “You made it. You possessed it. And you distributed it.”
And after confiscating the device, any additional explicit photos of minors found can add years to a sentence.

If convicted, a felony record can be carried by the minor offender into adulthood, eventually landing them in the state prison, forcing them – male or female – to register as a sex offender and preventing them from owning a gun, voting and other rights not extended to convicted felons.
“The laws on this are pretty darn harsh,” Recke said.

Ray, who heads up cyber sex crime investigations for Post 2, warned students that it is possible for police and pedophiles to obtain images from apps that claim to delete photos after they are viewed.
“This is not something to be taken lightly,” Ray said. “This is serious.”

Cemetery appeals for assistance


Thursday, April 28, 2016

On the Edge of Town: We Deliver

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Princeton man missing

Kentucky State Police are currently attempting to locate a missing person from Princeton. 

Russell B. Mitchell, 55, was last heard from or seen on Sunday, April 17 at approximately 5:30 p.m.

This is a white male 5-foot-11, 140 pounds, with blonde hair and blue eyes. He may be operating a green 1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass with KY license plate 758 NGS.

Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of Mr. Mitchell is urged to contact the KSP at 1-270-676-3313 or toll-free in Kentucky, at 1-800-222-5555, or your local law enforcement agency.

Call: We're en route with lunch

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Spring Sports Photographs Online

Phones ringing for felony eraser

FROM THE CRITTENDEN PRESS

Gov. Matt Bevin recently signed into law House Bill 40, giving non-violent felony offenders an opportunity to have their criminal record erased.

Now, the phone is already ringing at Crittenden County Courthouse.

Crittenden Circuit Clerk Melissa Guill said more than a half-dozen people contacted her office in the first few days after the bill became law through strong bipartisan support.

HB 40 will allow Kentuckians convicted of certain Class D felonies who have paid their debt to society, stayed out of trouble as required by the law and have shown that they are indeed trying to get back on track to erase their criminal records and get a second chance at jobs, voting, owning a firearm, housing and other opportunities sometimes denied felons, the governor’s office said in a news release issued last week.

Guill said her office cannot accept any applications for the new process until the law goes into effect on July 15. Several questions remain about the details of how felons will go about applying to have their rights restored. Guill said she is telling everyone who calls to check back at the end of this month. She hopes to have more information by then.

The bill’s language, written by Senate President Robert Stivers, R-Manchester, allows felons not to expunge their records, but erase them after meeting certain requirements, such as a five-year waiting period and completing all sentence requirements. The bill passed in the Senate 33-5 and later in the House 84-13.

What Guill believes is that there will be an application fee of $500. A person can file the forms with or without an attorney.

Approval will also be required from Kentucky State Police, which will do a thorough check to determine whether the offenses meet the requirements of HB 40.

“They will have to make sure the felonies are ones allowed to be expunged,” Guill said.

Otherwise, there are many details about the process that the clerk’s office will have to determine prior to allowing anyone to begin the process.

Guill said most of the calls she’s taking are from people who believe they will have a better chance to find quality employment once their record is clear.

There are 61 Class D felony offenses that will fall under the new law, capturing about 70 percent of the Class-D felon population, according to the governor’s office.

GOP town hall set for tonight at Fohs Hall

Crittenden County Republican Party will host a congressional candidate town hall meeting tonight at Fohs Hall. First Congressional District hopefuls James Comer, Mike Pape and Jason Batts have indicated they will attend the party’s primer for the May 17 Republican primary in Kentucky.

Guests to the 7 p.m. event will be able to pose questions to three of the four Republicans vying to fill the vacancy that will be left when 11-term U.S. Rep Ed Whitfield, R-Hopkinsville, retires at the end of his current term. There is no cost to attend the town hall.

None of the three GOP candidates for U.S. Senate will be attending the political event.

Welding helps bond father, son together

Together building a motorized tricycle designed for drifting has helped Lucas
Graham (left) and his father Nathan strengthen their bond through welding.

From The Crittenden Press, April 21
Made mostly from repurposed parts, Lucas Graham’s motorized big wheel is more than fun for the road, it’s a rallying point for furthering a father-son relationship.

Graham, and his dad, Nathan, have been working in the family’s shop to build what’s formally known as a drift trike. The contraption looks a whole lot like a popular children’s Big Wheel, but this one is made of metal, not plastic. It has a gasoline engine purchased from Harbor Freight, unlike the toy Big Wheel which is operated by pedal power. And instead of cracking open a box to give his son an outfit like this, Nathan Graham has used this as an opportunity to teach his son a number of skills such as welding and fabrication in addition to giving the two some bonding time.

“I sometimes take for granted that I know how to do all these things and want to be able to share this with my son,” Nathan said. “It gives us time to be together and work on something.”

The drift trike is a tricycle that has slick rear wheels. It is designed to intentionally lose traction in the rear end in order to allow the rider to perform maneuvers such as power slides on slick pavement. A bike like this would cost around $1,500 if purchased retail, but so far the Grahams have a few hours and less than $400 in it.

By now, the rig is probably painted and on the road, and 14-year-old Lucas may be enjoying it with friends, but chances are he will never forget the fellowship forged while designing and building the trike with his father.

Nathan said he tries to make sure there are things his family can do together. Dad is a teacher at the Earle C. Clements Job Corps in Union County. On the weekends, they kayak and bike and piddle around the shop with other projects, including some vintage cars they’ve picked up over the years such as 1958 Chevy pickup and a 1969 1/2 Ford Maverick.

Nathan, a deacon in his Baptist church, said he grew up without having much, so he learned how to do things with his hands. He is a heavy equipment mechanic and has many other vocational skills. Now, he’s passing that along to his son and making memories with a set of hot wheels.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Dinner can be delivered

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Area death

Wanda Mae McGrew, 91, of Smithland died today at Livingston Hospital. Boyd Funeral Directors and Cremation Services in Salem is in charge of arrangements.

What's news this week in Crittenden County...

Kelsey Lucas
Because she’s defied odds that were stacked against her, Crittenden County senior Kelsey Lucas will be among a host of student-athletes honored Thursday at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium where the voice of the Kentucky Wildcats, Tom Leach, will unveil his Kentucky All-Resilient Team.

For the rest of this story and the following headlines, see this week's issue of The Crittenden Press:
  • Final school day moved to May 26.
  • Police still looking for armed McDonald’s bandit.
  • Veterans organization disbanding after 92 years.
  • Cruce closing Just-A-Bug’r Sunday after years as local restauranteur.
  • 1st-ever family fair offers parents, youth insight to critical services.
  • Bechler heads to RNC convention.
  • OPINION: Two-letter word has ups, downs.
  • OPINION: Truth and nothing but the truth, so help me God.
  • School district has greenest fleet in Ky.
  • IN PICTURES: Scenes from last week's Backroads Festival.
  • Reality store teaches teens about budget choices.
  • Winters recognized with 4th ROCKET WAY award.
  • Riverview Park now more kid-friendly.
  • Local scholarship open to 4-H youth.
  • Jobless rate ticks up in March in Crittenden, 64 other Ky. counties.
  • IN PICTURES: Students return from trips to Europe, D.C.
  • Stallions party of U.S. Navy’s elite submariner force.
  • 10 firsts awarded to locals for art.
  • FORGOTTEN PASSAGES: Future for county looked bright in 1901.
  • Chapel Hill seeks emergency funds.
  • Fohs offering scholarships for higher ed.
  • Crittenden Grand Jury indicts on auto theft, drugs, cold checks.
  • SPORTS: High school diamond roundup.
  • SPORTS: High school track and field results.
  • SPORTS: Caldwell, Crittenden, Dawson, Lyon Youth Baseball & Softball Leagues page returns for spring, summer.

Friday's driver's testing canceled

There will be no driver’s testing in Crittenden County on Friday, according to the circuit clerk’s office. That includes both the written and road tests.

KDFWR auctions surplus, confiscated property

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources will conduct its spring auction of surplus and confiscated items Monday at department headquarters in Frankfort.

Surplus auction items include boats, motors, trucks and various equipment. Bidding on surplus items to open to everyone.

Confiscated auction items include shotguns, rifles, pistols, tree stands, bows and more. According to Under state law, only qualified Kentucky residents may bid on confiscated items.

A list of all items to be offered at auction is available online at fw.ky.gov, the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife website. The list also includes the stipulations of the auction. All items are sold as is.

Viewing begins at 8 a.m. EST, with bidding to begin at 10 a.m. The auction will be held near the Salato Wildlife Education Center, which is located on the headquarters campus of Kentucky Fish and Wildlife at 1 Sportsman's Lane. Visitors may find the headquarters complex off U.S. 60 in Frankfort, approximately 1.5 miles west of the intersection with U.S. 127. A bronze deer statue marks the entrance.

Calvert City Legion offers Rites

FROM THE CRITTENDEN PRESS

The rendering of Military Rites for an eligible veteran can be a special part of a funeral service and it is something few in this area may realize is available.

American Legion Post 236 in Calvert City has an honor guard that provides rites at funerals throughout the area.

Terry Black, a member of the Burna American Legion Auxiliary, said a number of Livingston County veterans have been honored with the special ceremony.

“It’s an awesome service,” Black said.

Richard Page, commander of the Post 236 Honor Guard, said his unit consists of 21 men and one woman. The group has done funerals from Hopkinsville to Paducah and places in between. Most ceremonies, which include the customary 21-gun salute, are held graveside.

There is no charge for the service, but donations are accepted to the American Legion.

“But that is not necessary,” Page said. “We do not expect anything for doing it.”

The unit brings all of its necessary supplies to the grave site, including weapons for the live-fire (blanks) salute, buglers who play "Taps," a flag to be presented to the next of kin of the deceased and the bayonetted gun, helmet, dog tags and boots that are symbolic of a fallen soldier.

Generally, a dozen members of the Calvert City honor guard – all dressed in punctuated military dress – perform the ceremony. It takes two flag folders, seven riflemen, two buglers and a chaplain.
“We like using two buglers to give it an echoing effect,” Page said.

The average age of the members in the honor guard is 74. Page hopes other area units take an interest and form their own team to provide rites to deserving military veterans.

To schedule the honor guard, simply notify your funeral director of a desire to have the service performed.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Time for Lunch...

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Help wanted



Who's on First?

Youth League Crittenden County Dugout Club Rosters
CO-ED ROOKIE LEAGUE
(ages 5-6)
TEAM 1
Coaches S.Peek/T.Coleman
Lilly Fernlund
Jack Porter
Alexis Mattingly
Emmitt Ellington
Nolan Payne
Reece Travis
Eden Carter
TEAM 2
Coach Sabrina Stokes
Dawson Parker
Drake Young
Isabella Cornwell
Hudson Stokes
Eli Lovell
Hunter Jackson
Lyle Thompson
Gabriel Hewitt
TEAM 3
Coach Jason Nesbitt
Conner Poindexter
Eli Herrin
Cameron Nesbitt
Abigail Champion
Caden Penn
Brenna Kemmer
Allison Martin
April Dismore
TEAM 4
Coach Darren Larue
Raylee Millikan
Ethan Gonzales
Kayden Farmer
Tucker Hardin
Cash Singleton
Coby Larue
Parker Wood
Wyatt Cartwright

Kickball
(ages 4-5)
TEAM 1
Coaches S.Carlson, J.Chittenden
Macandiss Chittenden
Gabrielle Holliman
Gage Adamson
Lilly Cappello
Cooper Rich
LJ Ward
Katrina Schott

TEAM 2
Coaches Megan and Cody Hunt
Bentley Rushing
Charlotte Curnel
Rex Boone
Benjamin Potter
Kiley Hunt
Brayden Duncan

Monday, April 25, 2016

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Youth baseball, softball jamboree

Saturday at Various League Sites in Marion, Princeton, Eddyvlle and Dawson Springs:

Lunch Time !

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Sunday, April 24, 2016

Area death

Bro. Leonard "Wayne" Winters, 69, of Marion died Friday at Crittenden Hospital. He was pastor of Hurricane Church in Tolu. Gilbert Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Marion competing for free concert

Social media entrepreneur Jonathan Burdon thinks his hometown can earn a free concert by an up-and-coming country band. All it will take is a few clicks.

Burdon, formerly of Marion, now lives in Nashville where he manages a social media platform known as Social Coaster. Through his network in Tennessee, Burdon has become friends with RJ Romeo, a well-known figure in the country music business. Romeo is launching a new product called VibeRoom which allows fans to essentially create demand for an act within a certain area of the country – which in turn creates opportunities for locations that normally wouldn't attract big-name artists.

“He is currently running an alpha test of his product,” Burdon said. “To test the theory, he has partnered with LoCash (formally LowCash Cowboys) to run a contest where one city can get a free concert.

Burdon
“I have asked him to add Marion because I have a theory that a smaller town can pull together enough votes and beat the larger markets,” Burdon said.

On a smartphone, tablet or computer, Marion supporters can go online to the LoCash.viberoom.us and quickly vote for their hometown.

“The more people share and spread the word, the greater the chance of winning, Burdon explained.

The contest ends Apr. 30.

"Marion, Kentucky is my home, I love this place. Being in a rural area can often limit us from hosting major musical acts. That is why I was  really excited when VibeRoom agreed to include us in their contest,” Burdon said. “Based on what I have seen thus far with the contest, I really think Marion has a great shot of winning if everyone takes a second to vote and encourages their friends to vote. It would be an amazing opportunity to bring a nationally known act like LoCash to our town for a free concert.”



Friday, April 22, 2016

What's for Dinner?

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Heritage Golf Course Tourney Schedule

The Heritage at Marion County Club has announced its 2016 golf tournament schedule, which includes the normal slate of events, plus a new 18-hole, one-day tournament, the 4-Person Gareth Hardin Memorial in memory of the late club director.

All of the events are open to the public except the Club Championship in September, which is available for members only. Here is this season’s schedule of events:

  • June 4-5 Four-Person Scramble
  • June 18-19 Buck & Doe Couples
  • July 16 Four-Person Gareth Hardin Memorial
  • July 23-24 Two-Man Scramble
  • Aug. 27-28 Sycamore Hills
  • Sept. 10-11 Club Championship


Thursday, April 21, 2016

Quilter offers personal narrative in work

A story in this week's issue of The Crittenden Press incorrectly stated
that Orpha Beachy (above) would be the featured quilter at a quilt
show at the Woman's Club of Marion. However, Beachy will be
featured at Marion City Hall from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

THE CRITTENDEN PRESS
At first glance, anyone would say that Orpha Beachy has some beautiful quilts. But spend a little time with her, and her quilts come to life in the form of a personal narrative.

Humble in her ability, Beachy has used quilting primarily to help others. She has only a few in her personal collection, and two in recent years have been People’s Choice Award winners from the Crittenden County Extension Homemakers Quilt Show.

Beachy will be the featured quilter in Saturday’s Backroads Quilt Show at Marion City Hall from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., displaying an assortment of quilts made by her and her mother, as well as some interesting quilting accessories.

The Beachys raised their six children in Belvidere, Tenn., before moving to Crittenden County in 2008.

Like most Mennonite women, quilting has always been a big part of her life. Following tradition, Beachy learned the art of quilting from her mother.

Most of Beachy’s skills were refined in monthly church “sewings,” alongside her mother and other women and their daughters. Traditionally, Mennonite women meet monthly and work together to prepare comforts, or blankets, for missions projects – a tradition Beachy and fellow church members recently resumed at the newly completed Fredonia Mennonite Church.

Customarily, females in the Mennonite and Amish communities around the country contribute their handiwork to Christian Aid Ministries, which operates a disaster relief agency, cannery and clothing center, among other things, and supplies a multitude of products to areas in need within the United States and abroad.

It was as a young girl sitting around the church fellowship hall in Stuarts Draft, Va., that Beachy began to make comforts, as she calls them, for her church’s missions projects. She first learned to simply cut material into squares, then progressed to piecing the cotton material before learning to make knotted blankets, those whose layers are tied together with yarn. Not until she was married in her early 20s did she learn to fine piece and quilt.

She learned the final step in the quilting process in old fashioned quilting bees still common in Amish and Mennonite communities today. In the absence of quilting machines, small groups of ladies sit in a large circle carefully aligning and pinning together the quilt top, batting and backing before sewing it together.

“The first quilt I probably made was after I was married,” said Beachy, 59. “I’m not a prolific quilter. I haven’t made a lot to keep, most of the things I have made are projects I made for relief projects.”

Even before she knew her family would be relocating to Crittenden County, she had begun collecting quilt pieces from friends in the south-central Tennessee community with the intention of making a charm quilt, in which every quilt square is a unique piece of material.

The quilt became her most special piece of work since it contains hundreds of memories from friends from Tennessee.

Instead of squares, Beachy’s charm quilt is made of triangles – 723 to be exact, each of a different color or print.

“It is my Belvidere Neighborhood Quilt,” Beachy says. “I collected scraps from the older ladies I used to visit in the neighborhood.”

One floral triangle came from a handkerchief she purchased at the estate sale of a lady she knew in Belvidere.

She didn’t know she would be moving to Crittenden County when she began collecting the fabric for the eventual neighborhood quilt, which is what increased the sentimental value of the finished product.

“I have the names of the people who gave me each piece, and some of them are embroidered around the edge of the quilt.”

The charm quilt was an ideal way for Beachy to experiment with color placement, a skill she learned from her mother.

“I really enjoy piecing, but I enjoy placing pieces more,” Beachy said. “I really enjoyed placing that quilt.

“I was first thinking I would use rainbow colors but there are pieces of grays and blacks, so I tried to place each piece as the colors linked together,” with pinks transitioning into reds and reds into purples and purples into blues.

With careful consideration, she placed florals and patterns between solids and the outcome was quite interesting.

“My mother liked to make rugs and work with color, and I like to play with colors,” she said.

It is also the first quilt she pieced after recovering from a serious car accident in 2005 that sidelined her quilting efforts. It took time for her to recover from a broken neck, and looking down to sew and quilt was at first impossible, then quite difficult for Beachy for several years.

Finally, in 2010 the charm quilt was completed and earned her first People’s Choice Award at the local Homemakers Quilt Show.

Another of her favorite quilts, which she uses as a bed covering in a spare bedroom, was a project her late sister actually began.

There are 50 large squares on the quilt, one for each of the United States, each depicting an embroidered state bird and flower.

“My sister had done 14 of them before she died. It was going to be her ‘quilt from home,’ following Mennonite tradition that mothers make a quilt for their child when they are married.”

Following her sister’s death, Beachy and her mother worked together to finish the quilt.

In an important touch to preserve the history of the quilts she makes, Beachy leaves her calling card in the form of a cursive “OB”, her initials, with details on the back corner of the quilt, such as when it was made or for whom. Some of her quilts are reversible, such as the quilts she made for each of her sons.

Quilting has been a significant part of her life, and she was amazed to learn Crittenden County’s rich quilting history when she moved here.

“I enjoyed finding that here, I really like the community,” she said. “The people have been very welcoming. God blessed us by putting us in this area.”

She has several unfinished quilt projects she plans to complete as her health allows, including a polyester Storm at Sea quilt that she pieced in 2000-01, which features triangles, squares and diamond pieces in three shades of blue. Another work in progress is a flower basket quilt, for which she collected floral fabric for several years.

She has also saved fabric from each of her family members, including her mother and mother-in-law, which she is saving for the perfect project.


Sell Your Stuff... Press Classifieds

Yard Sale?
Need to get rid of some stuff?
Have a car to sell?

Press Classifieds are a sure-bet way to move the items you have for sale and Spring is a great time to think about getting rid of some of that stuff.

Place your ad right from your computer.



Armed robbery last night at McDonald's

Marion Police are asking for help in solving an armed robbery that occurred last night at McDonald’s restaurant on Main Street.

Just before midnight and armed man dressed in black robbed two McDonald’s employees of an undisclosed amount of money. The robber is believed to be a white male about 5-foot-6 or 5-foot-8 in height and slim build. He was wearing black pants, a black hooded sweatshirt, black gloves and sunglasses. 

Marion Police Chief Ray O’Neal said a female shift manager and a male employee had closed up the restaurant for the night and were walking together toward their vehicles in the parking lot when the robber stepped out from behind one of the cars, brandished a handgun and told them to “get down and give me the bag.” He took a money bag the woman was carrying and fled on foot in a northerly direction on Poplar Street, which runs behind McDonald’s.

Marion police and sheriff’s deputies searched for almost three hours throughout the neighborhoods behind McDonald’s but could not locate the suspect.

TipLine is offering a reward in this case. Anyone with information may call (270) 965-3500 and remain anonymous.

School district seeks input from parents

Parents, do you know what Title I is, and how it works in your school district?

Local schools are served by schoolwide Title I funds, which provide the district with academic services for all students. Parental input is valued and needed in order to provide exceptional services and opportunities for learning and growth among students.

There will be a Title I Planning, Policy and Evaluation meeting for the district and schools from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Monday in the Rocket Arena conference room. Parents are encouraged to attend to learn more about Title I services and provide feedback to help grow a more effective program.

Light refreshments will be provided, and no advance registration is necessary. For more information, email tonya.driver@crittenden.kyschools.us.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

What's news this week in Crittenden County...

Orpha Beachy is this year's featured
quilter at the Woman's Club quilt show.
At first glance, anyone would say that Orpha Beachy has some beautiful quilts. But spend a little time with her, and her quilts come to life in the form of a personal narrative. Humble in her ability, Beachy has used quilting primarily to help others. She has only a few in her personal collection, and two in recent years have been People’s Choice Award winners from the Crittenden County Extension Homemakers Quilt Show.

For more on this story, this week's Amish Tour and Backroads Festival and the following headlines, see this week's issue of The Crittenden Press:
  • Lawmakers OK $67 million to restart U.S. 641.
  • Chess team 6th in nation.
  • KSP: Consequences of sexting can last lifetime.
  • Park vandal gets 3 months in jail.
  • Marion looks to manage storm water runoff.
  • Welding helps bond father, son together.
  • GOP town hall just week away.
  • Family Fair to offer direction to those in need.
  • SCHEDULE OF EVENTS: Numerous events slated for quilters, Backroads goers.
  • Quilts serving double duty at church.
  • Woodward retiring as dispatcher.
  • This week's obituaries.
  • School district seeks input from parents.
  • IN PICTURES: Elementary students compete in track events.
  • IN PICTURES: Elementary students learn of career possibilities.
  • Latest jobless rate in state at 5.6 percent.
  • High school's ag ed students manage test plot.
  • Former Extension Service agent helps to serve others in Belize.
  • SPORTS: High school Diamond roundups.
  • SPORTS: High school track and field results.
  • Take a trip to Emerald City and support Relay for Life.
  • Ky. lottery games now available online.
  • Classes set for planning, planting vegetable gardens.
  • More license plate birdhouses for sale.
  • Smithland Civil War re-enactment, activities take place this weekend.
  • 5 generations together for a weekend.
  • FORGOTTEN PASSAGES: Marion business community thrives in 1926.
  • Concert Creator: Burdon wants to prove Marion can win contest.
  • LEGISLATIVE REVIEW: Ky. budget agreement finally reached.
  • LEGISLATIVE REVIEW: 59 Senate bills poised to become law in Ky. later this year.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Guess alternate to GOP convention

(This story originally appeared in the April 14 edition of The Crittenden Press.)

By DARYL K. TABOR
THE CRITTENDEN PRESS
Cleveland rocks, but it’s not just because it’s home to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This summer, it will be home to the hottest political event so far this millennium, and Gordon Guess will be there. Last weekend, he got his ticket punched to the Republican National Convention (RNC) in July.

Guess on April 9 was elected by county-level delegates in the 1st Congressional District as one of three alternates who will join three delegates from the district to the RNC in Cleveland, Ohio. It appears unlikely any of the three current GOP hopefuls for the presidential nomination will have earned the number of delegates required to be the party’s candidate on the November ballot, so the first contested or brokered convention since 1976 is possible.

Guess, a lifelong Republican who says his idea of fun is politics, had a glow in his eyes discussing what will be his third trip to a GOP convention.

Guess
“There's no way to tell how I enjoy it. This has really charged me up,” the 79-year-old said. “I'm on fire.”

No one in Crittenden County is as keen a study of national politics as Guess. In 1980, he served as a delegate to the GOP convention in Detroit that offered Ronald Reagan to voters. Eight years earlier, he went to Miami as an officer with the Nixon campaign in Kentucky. As an alternate delegate this year, Guess will simply fill in on the floor of Quicken Loans Arena should one of Kentucky’s 46 delegates have to step away from their seat.

“You have to be more ready than football players coming off the bench...all four days,” he explained.

If Guess gets the call, he could be a part of the delegation that elects a nominee, just like he did 36 years ago in the Motor City.

“The delegates decide who's gonna be the nominee, I’m sorry to tell you,” Guess said of a potentially contested convention, “not John Doe.”

Even before he was old enough to vote in his first presidential election, he was out signing up voters during Dwight Eisenhower’s 1956 bid for re-election to the White House. At that time, you had to be 21 to vote. Even as a 17-year-old, Guess was hooked on politics.

“I think I heard every word of the Eisenhower-Taft race,” he said of Ike’s close but successful run at President four years earlier against U.S. Robert A. Taft of Ohio.

Guess admits he has voted for a couple of Democrats over the last 58 years, but none are likely to get his vote this November, regardless of who emerges as the nominee out of Cleveland – frontrunner Donald Trump, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, Ohio Gov. John Kasich or perhaps even someone currently on the sidelines. It could take multiple ballots by delegates to the convention to pick a nominee, but Guess surmises that any rancor in the party following the selection will be short-lived even if the top delegate-earner is snubbed.

“Will it cause split?” offered Guess, who is a Kasich supporter. “Sure it will...for a day or two. By November, everyone will be back on the same page. That’s how it works.”

While today’s media has billed a possible contested Republican convention as historic, as a long study of politics, Guess scoffs at the notion.

“This pales in comparison to the Garfield election,” he roared.

In 1880, James A. Garfield emerged from Chicago as the Republican presidential nominee after 36 convention votes by delegates. It even took two floor votes at the convention in 1952 – the one that helped get Guess hooked on politics – for Eisenhower to defeat Taft for the nomination.

“What you think can happen does, and some other things you'd never think about,” a politically-astute Guess said of the wrangling that takes place at a party convention. “I don't care what anybody tells you, there is such a thing as a smoke-filled room (where deals are made).”

There were no smoke-filled rooms April 9 in Hopkinsville during the 1st District Republican Convention, but it wasn’t by luck that Guess was chosen as an alternate. He had to submit a biography, of sorts, to the Republican Party of Kentucky to put his hat in the ring. He’s never held office, but with a long history of party involvement from national conventions to helping his pal Mitch McConnell get elected six times to the U.S. Senate to deep local involvement both publicly and behind the scenes, Guess had the resume to make the cut.   However, it wasn’t just his political pedigree that won the day.

“I had an edge over the others (at the 1st District convention),” Guess said. “I’m a lot older.”

Elected April 9 at the district convention as delegates were Christian County's George Barnett, Republican 1st District Chairman Richard Grana of McCracken County and Barbara Barnett of Taylor County. Other alternates are Kathy Dietrich of Trigg County and Simpson County's Robert Taylor.

Guess will be 80 when the convention rolls around July 18-21, so he says this will be his last go at the RNC. As an alternate, his schedule won’t be filled at the convention with committee meetings like he experienced in 1980, and this will allow him every opportunity to enjoy the political theater firsthand.

“I'm looking forward to it,” he said. “If you like mystery, you'll jump at the chance to be active like this.”

For park pavilion reservations...

The Marion-Crittenden County Park has two pavilions available for residents planning special events. The pavilions have electricity and water available nearby. For more information or to reserve a pavilion, contact Tourism Department at (270) 965-5015. For those who have reservations, the park encourages you to post a sign at the pavilion the morning of your event.

Breast, Cervical Cancer Checks

SCREENINGS


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Marion Votes for Free Concert

Social media entrepreneur Jonathan Burdon thinks his hometown can earn a free concert by an up-and-coming country band. All it will take is a few clicks.

Burdon, formerly of Marion, now lives in Nashville where he manages a social media platform known as Social Coaster. Through his network in Tennessee, Burdon has become friends with RJ Romeo, a well-known figure in the country music business. Romeo is launching a new product called VibeRoom which allows fans to essentially create demand for an act within a certain area of the country – which in turn creates opportunities for locations that normally wouldn't attract big-name artists.

“He is currently running an alpha test of his product,” Burdon said. “To test the theory, he has partnered with LoCash (formally LowCash Cowboys) to run a contest where one city can get a free concert.

Burdon
“I have asked him to add Marion because I have a theory that a smaller town can pull together enough votes and beat the larger markets,” Burdon said.

On a smartphone, tablet or computer, Marion supporters can go online to the LoCash.viberoom.us and quickly vote for their hometown.

“The more people share and spread the word, the greater the chance of winning, Burdon explained.

The contest ends Apr. 30.

"Marion, Kentucky is my home, I love this place. Being in a rural area can often limit us from hosting major musical acts. That is why I was  really excited when VibeRoom agreed to include us in their contest,” Burdon said. “Based on what I have seen thus far with the contest, I really think Marion has a great shot of winning if everyone takes a second to vote and encourages their friends to vote. It would be an amazing opportunity to bring a nationally known act like LoCash to our town for a free concert.”




Monday, April 18, 2016

Area Death

Joseph S. Fritts, 70, of Marion died Saturday, at Livingston Hospital. Gilbert Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Eileen Tabor, 91, of Salem died Sunday. Boyd Funeral Directors and Cremation Services in Salem is in charge of arrangements.

Saturday, April 16, 2016

PACS driver using own car to deliver meals

Tina Jones has taken to using her own vehicle to deliver meals from  Crittenden County Senior Citizens Center to local residents after state regulations kicked in, preventing the use of center vehicles.

From the April 7 issue of The Crittenden Press
When state regulations recently kicked in that limited how vehicles belonging to Pennyrile Allied Community Services (PACS) could be used, Tina Jones stepped up and offered her own Chevrolet Cavalier to deliver meals to the elderly.

Her altruism was of no surprise to Jenny Sosh, director of Crittenden County Senior Citizens Center.

“She is always willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done,” Sosh said.

Jones, 69, is retired from the local hospital. She has worked 11 years off and on for PACS. She is a lifelong Crittenden County resident and knows most of the people on her 13-mile Meals on Wheels route through the city.

“You really get attached to the people you deliver to,” she said. “For a lot of them, I am the only person they see all day.”

Through the senior center, Hopkinsville-based PACS has for many years offered a meal five days a week to shut-ins or the elderly. It is a program that those on the receiving end have come to rely upon. So when regulations began affecting the use of PACS vehicles for this effort, the senior center needed to find a way to keep its wheels turning without violating the operational policy on its fleet of three government-owned vehicles.

Sosh said there is a formula that directs the number of miles for which those automobiles can be deployed to deliver something other than people to a destination. In other words, the Meals on Wheels program was looking for an alternative source of transportation when Jones offered her private car for the job.

Linda Davis drives a PACS vehicle on her route for Meals on Wheels out in the county, traveling about 60 miles a day. In order to meet state guidelines, the much shorter city route needed some help and that is where Jones stepped in.

She takes a plate of food to almost 20 people every day.

“I don’t mind it,” she said about driving her personal car and getting paid 40 cents per mile to cover fuel and other costs. “I feel like this is my part to help the community. I do what I have to do. I love my job and my people.”

Rachel Cook, aging director for PACS, said there is an area-wide restructuring of how service vehicles can be used. She said in some cases, residents under 60 will have to call Princeton for a ride. The senior center will continue to serve those 60 and over with their transportation needs.

Congressional hopefuls to gather for town hall

The Crittenden Press
Republicans in Kentucky have already selected their presidential nominee, but there’s still work to be done. In many ways, what’s up next is even more important than the race for the White House, claims Crittenden County Republican Party’s vice chairman.

“This is a very, very, very important race,” Fred Stubblefield said of Kentucky’s May primary election that features a contest for the seat to be vacated by 11-term U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Hopkinsville. “We’re replacing a congressman who’s been in there a long time. He knows our community, and he’s helped us. We need to make sure that continues.”

To help GOP voters decide who they want to appear on the November ballot to face the Democratic opposition looking to take an open seat in Congress, Crittenden County Republican Party is hosting a town hall meeting next week featuring three of the party’s four 1st District congressional candidates. Jason Batts, Mike Pape and James Comer have agreed to participate in the April 28 event at Fohs Hall in Marion. It is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. and should wrap up by 9 p.m. or sooner, Stubblefield said.

Stubblefield said tentative plans are for prospective voters at the town hall to submit to party officials their questions to candidates at the event on index cards. Duplicate queries can then be weeded out. Candidates will likely be given about 10 minutes to speak before questions from the audience.

Stubblefield said some Republicans appear to be under the impression they have nothing to vote for in the May 17 primary since they cast their presidential ballot in the March 5 caucus. However, he explained, nothing could be further from the truth.

“This is going to be a very big election,” he said of the contests for the U.S. House and Senate. “Republicans do have a vote in this primary, and it’s very important.”

In Crittenden, Livingston and Caldwell counties, Republicans will pick nominees for Capitol Hill, but there will be no primary for the statehouse. Rep. Lynn Bechler, R-Marion, is unopposed and Sen. Dorsey Ridley, D-Henderson, was elected to another four-year term  in 2014. Republicans in Union and Webster counties will also have no statehouse races.

Democrats, meantime, will nominate from four candidates for President, two for U.S. House of Representatives and a crowded field of seven for U.S. Senate. Democrats in Crittenden, Livingston, Caldwell, Union and Webster counties will have no statehouse contests.

The deadline to register to vote in next month’s primary was Monday, and it is also too late to switch political parties.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Area Deaths

Edward Bridges, 90, of Marion died Friday. Myers Funeral Home in Marion is in charge of arrangements.

Ruth “Dot” Laird Meredith, 72, of Erin, Tenn., formerly of Marion, died Wednesday. Myers Funeral Home in Marion is in charge of arrangements.

Kenneth Edward “Jackie” Croft, Sr., 87, of Petersburg, Va., died Sunday, April 10. He was a graduate of Tolu High School.

Bobby Glenn Thurman, 81, of Marion died Tuesday at Deaconess VNA Plus in Evansville. Myers Funeral Home in Marion is in charge of arrangements.

James Alvis Reed, 68, of Salem died Tuesday at Lourdes Hospital. Boyd Funeral Directors and Cremation Services in Salem was in charge of arrangements.

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Free dump days

Today and Saturday are free dumping days in Crittenden County. Take just about anything you want to get rid of to the Crittendon County Convenience Center on US Highway 60. No charge.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Health department screens for cancer

Pennyrile District Health Department is looking to check out a few women.

The regional health department that operates the local health center is targeting women ages 21 to 64 for breast and cervical cancer screenings next week. The goal through the Kentucky Women’s Screening Program is to detect the two cancers early and increase the odds of beating the disease.

The health screenings will take place Wednesday at Crittenden County Health Center off Industrial Drive in Marion. All participants will receive a gift basket, and those who complete a survey will be entered into a drawing to win a $100 gas card.

The same screenings and incentives will be offered today at Livingston County Health Center in Smithland.

Rockets, Lady Rockets knocked out in 'A'

Crittenden County's baseball team lost 6-3 to Livingston Central and the CCHS softball girls lost 9-5 to Caldwell County, knocking both local squads out of All A Classic tournaments Wednesday.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

April 23 fair aims to offer families help

Life in Christ Church will host the initial Crittenden County Family Fair April 23 at the church on U.S. 641.

The event is being presented in conjunction with 5th Judicial Circuit Family Court and is being held in April to coincide with Child Abuse Prevention Month. There will be activities for children, including bounce houses and games, and free food for everyone who comes out between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Information booths from police agencies, banks, Crittenden County Food Bank, DivorceCare, Sanctuary in Hopkinsville, Crittenden County Counseling Center, the health department, Community Christmas, Head Start and after-school programs, as well as many other interests, will be set up at the first-ever event. The goal is to help families learn where to get assistance locally with food, clothing, domestic violence, drug and alcohol abuse, mental health issues, financial stability, education and much more.

What news this week in Crittenden County...

Jake Perryman and his turkey calls
Everyone knows that necessity is the mother on invention, especially the wild turkey hunter. Those who pursue the cautious strutters of spring are quick to try anything to get an edge on their unpredictable prey. For Tolu resident Jake Perryman, the drive to harvest turkeys has led to a sideline job making calls.

For more on this story and the following headlines, pick up a copy of this week's issue of The Crittenden Press:
  • Guess alternate to GOP convention in Cleveland.
  • Cave in Rock woman to set up easel at Backroads event.
  • CCHS sends 2 more to Craft Academy.
  • Voter rolls close Monday in Ky.
  • Free dumping Friday, Saturday.
  • Census Bureau estimates county population down again.
  • April 23 fair aims to offer families help.
  • Calvert City Legion encourages other posts to perform military funerals.
  • Barn owl nests in Crittenden sought by biologists.
  • CCES third nine week's honor roll released.
  • CCES February Rocket Role Models named.
  • Berry sworn as postmaster.
  • Bids awarded for work at jail’s RCC.
  • Fatality involves man from Fredonia.
  • ‘Love Bags’ to help foster kids.
  • Annual Crittenden County jobless rate falls to 5.5 percent last year.
  • Health department screens for cancer.
  • Library offering fine amnesty this week.
  • Jobs of local 911 telecommunicators recognized.
  • OPINION: Trip explores idiom ‘You can go home, but can’t go back’.
  • Marion donors not giving to presidential frontrunners.
  • Bevin appoints new secretary for KyTC.
  • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE: Friday last hope to pass 2-year state budget.
  • Insurance April topic at Woman’s Club meeting.
  • Yarbrough chairs Farmers Bancorp.
  • Salem mail carrier logs millionth mile.
  • Cool, wet weather holds up planting.
  • SPORTS: Diamond round-ups.
  • OUTDOORS: Local hunters finding fewer spring turkeys.
  • FORGOTTEN PASSAGES: New school relieves crowding in 1895.

Auction Postponed

New Date and Time
on this local auction

Get Checked in Any County

SCREENINGS


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Monday, April 11, 2016

Board of ed meets Tuesday

Crittenden County Board of Education April working session is 6 p.m. Tuesday in the Rocket Arena Conference room.

Area Death

Evelyn Loraine (Quertermous) James, 85, of Salem died Sunday. Boyd Funeral Directors and Cremation Services is in charge of arrangements. 

Job Opportunity


Friday, April 8, 2016

Area death

Martha Nell Byford, 88, of Marion died Thursday, April 7, 2016 at Crittenden County Health and Rehabilitation Services. Myers Funeral Home in Marion is in charge of arrangements.

Postage rates will decrease Sunday

The cost of a first-class stamp to mail Grandma a birthday card or send in your car payment will drop to 47 cents next month. Yes, that’s right, the U.S. Postal Service will be reducing the cost of mailing a standard domestic letter for the first time since the price plummeted a penny to 2 cents on July 1, 1919.

The 2-cent reduction in the current 49 cents for a first-class stamp will take effect April 10. The lower rate is part of an overall reduction in USPS rates mandated by the Postal Regulatory Commission and tied to the expiration of a 4.3 percent rate increase. It is expected to worsen the postal service’s financial condition by $2 billion, according to USPS.com.

Job Opening