Monday, August 31, 2020

Schools will be back in session Tuesday

Crittenden County Schools will be back in session tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 1. 

The school announced this afternoon that work had done its due diligence to get the buildings clean and ready for students to return.

"Our custodial teams thoroughly deep cleaned and sanitized all buildings today in preparation for our Rockets' return. Please continue healthy at home/healthy at school practices to keep everyone safe, including hand washing, wearing your mask when moving, and social distancing," the school district's announcement said.


Judge Newcom supports Kenergy's plan

Crittenden County officials are applauding an announcement that an electric cooperative is exploring possibilities of providing reliable broadband to rural areas of this county and others it serves.

Kenergy, an electric distribution cooperative serving 14 western Kentucky counties, has long been touted as a natural provider of internet access for far-flung areas of the commonwealth that because of its low population has not attracted other reliable providers. Crittenden County Judge-Executive Perry Newcom said last week during the fiscal court meeting that regulatory issues have long been a stumbling block for Kenergy and other entities like it. But now, he said, there is a movement to change those and he’s urging local leaders and community residents to contact their legislators who can influence change.

- - Email support to psc.info@ky.gov - - 

- - Judge Newcom's Letter to PSC --

“Kenergy is looking into offering broadband services,” Kenergy President and CEO Jeff Hohn said in a recent news release by the cooperative. “There are several legislative and regulatory hurdles that we would have to clear before that opportunity would be available for us.”

Kenergy’s desire to provide broadband access emanates from the same factors that propelled the Rural Electrification Act into existence. For-profit electric utilities had little desire to extend electric service

Sunday, August 30, 2020

Seven new COVID-19 cases announced today

Crittenden County has announced seven new cases of COVID-19, bringing its total to 61 since the pandemic began in March.

All of those newly diagnosed are recovering at home. 

Here are ages and genders for the new cases:

  • 71-year-old male
  • 35-year-old female
  • 30-year-old male
  • 58-year-old male
  • 41-year-old female
  • 68-year-old female
  • 57-year-old male

Schools closed Monday

Crittenden County Schools will not be in session to start the school week. The following is a message released today by the school district.

Crittenden County Schools will cancel all classes on Monday, Aug. 31. The announcement comes in response to the Pennyrile District Health Department’s report of two Covid-19 positive cases at Crittenden County High School to the school district on Sunday. 

Superintendent Vince Clark said all schools in the district will be closed in order to allow for deep cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting, and for contact tracing to be completed. Only administrative teams and custodial teams at each school should report to their respective buildings to work. 

The closure simply will be a non-school day. In-person students will not be participating in remote learning. Virtual students have the option to continue their online assignments if they choose. Senior Academy students should report to their Madisonville campus as usual. Finally, all after-school practices are canceled. 

Clark said the district intends to resume school for all students, both in-person and virtual, on Tuesday, Sept. 1.

Saturday, August 29, 2020

What you need to know: 2020 General Election

Important Voting Dates

  • Starting Aug. 24: Online portal for requesting a mail-in ballot at GoVoteKy.gov opened.
  • Oct. 5: Last day to register to vote for the Nov. 3 election.
  • Oct. 9: Online portal to request mail-in ballot closes at 10:59 p.m. Mail-in ballots cannot be requested after that date.
  • Oct. 13: In-person voting on the absentee machine inside the county clerk’s office begins and continues weekdays during regular business hours.
  • Oct. 17, 24 and 31: In-person Saturday voting offered. Times and location to be announced.
  • Nov. 2: Last day to vote on the absentee machine inside the clerk’s office, ending at 4 p.m.
  • Nov. 3: Election Day, in-person polls will be open 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mail-in ballots must be postmarked or deposited inside the secure voting dropbox by 6 p.m.
  • Nov. 6: Last day a postmarked ballot delivered by the post office can be accepted.


Friday, August 28, 2020

Spread of virus remains concern in county

Three more cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in Crittenden County today. That makes 20 in the past eight or nine days, the biggest spread of the virus her since the pandemic started in March.

The new cases are a 72-year-old male, a 37-year-old female and a 42-year-old male. None of them are sick enough to be in the hospital. 

To date, Crittenden County has reported 54 cases since records began being kept in the spring.


Contact Grant Rogers to discus WoodmenLife

 

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Planning for the future can cost you as little as $17.24 a month.

Contact Grant Rogers, representative for WoodmenLife, to learn more about the availability of life insurance policies and other financial savings plans.

Rogers' office is located on Gum Street in Marion behind Tabor's Towing & Repair.

Manhunt underway in Crittenden near WMA

Update:  A suspect was apprehended and questioned by authorities on on Ky. 365, but Sheriff Wayne Agent said it turned out to be the wrong man. The real suspect wanted by Union County authorities was apparently not in the area. The mixup occurred when the suspect that was indeed apprehended realized law enforcement was chasing him. He apparently had a warrant in an unrelated matter and took off trying to elude police, leading the subsequent manhunt.

Original post
Law enforcement in Union and Crittenden counties are in the northern part of Crittenden County near the Big Rivers Wildlife Management Area searching for a Union County man who is wanted in that county.

The suspect, who has a significant criminal history, is believe to be potentially dangerous. He was last seen swimming across the Tradewater River into Crittenden County.

The search area is between Ky. 365 and Graingertown.


Rite Temp seeks HVAC technician

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Rite Temp Heating & Air Condition, LLC is looking for an experienced technician.


Rite Temp services Crittenden and surrounding counties. Prospective employee must have valid driver's license and journeyman's card.


Some overtime expected. Company vehicle provided.


To learn more, call today.

Inspection period for Hopkins County auction upcoming

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An auction of 1,879 acres in Hopkins County will be conducted by Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc.
The property is being offered in 19 tracts and includes cropland, hunting and recreation land, potential timber investment and contiguous, productive, tillable land.

The property is located between Madisonville and Owensboro. However, the auction will be conducted at the Hopkins County Fairgrounds in Madisonville.

Inspection dates are Aug. 20, Aug. 29 and Sept. 9. For more information, contact Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc.

Four more COVID cases reported

Four more cases of COVID-19 have been discovered in Crittenden County.

These were announced Friday morning. They are a 48-year-old female and 49-year-old male living in the same home, a 44-year-old female, and a 58-year-old female.

This brings the county's total to 51 cases confirmed since records began being kept in March and the 17th in the past eight days.

One injured in overnight accident

A single-vehicle accident sometime around midnight last night, went undetected for a period of time and the male driver was badly injured.

The crash was reported about 1:15am on Ky. 855 North.

Crittenden County Sheriff's Department and Crittenden County Rescue Squad were dispatched the scene. The rescue squad had to extricate the victim from the vehicle. 

Just outside the community of Frances, the vehicle had gone off the roadway and hit a tree.

He was flown from the scene by Air Evac to a regional hospital with serious injuries.


Thursday, August 27, 2020

City Council meets Monday on tax rates, annexation


Marion City Council will have a special-called meeting at 5:15pm on Monday, Aug. 31 at city hall.

Here is the Agenda

 1. Introduction and 1st Reading of Ordinance #20-16 entitled, “An Ordinance Relating to the Tax Levy for the Year of 2019, City of Marion, Kentucky”

2. 2nd Reading of Ordinance #20-15 entitled, “An Ordinance Declaring the City of Marion’s Intent to Annex Territory Known as Marion Hardwoods, Inc and Marion-Crittenden County Airport into the City”


Join Our Virtual Tour of Marion Kentucky

   MARION MAIN STREET, INC.

CrittendenPress HistoryVignettes

A collaborative project between The Crittenden Press, Marion Main Street, Inc., and the Crittenden County Historical Society is bringing history to life with virtual tours of some of Marion’s most unique and significant landmarks. See these short history vignettes on YouTube.

Historic Carlisle Street is a nostalgic one-way thoroughfare in Marion that runs in front of this enchanting building that was once a United States Ration Center. 

In the 1940s, during those trying times of World War II, local residents would come here to be issued ration books, which contained removable stamps that could be exchanged for rationed items such as sugar, meat, cooking oil and even gasoline. 

Built around 1905, this was also once the U.S. Post Office. Metal bars protecting the existing windows were characteristic of early American post offices. 

This two-story structure has served the community in many ways. It was once known as the Blue-Nunn Building, named for its owners whose surnames were Blue and Nunn. They were also fluorspar mine owners. It was for many years a dry cleaning business, at one time run by a former football coach. It was called Coach’s Cleaners. 

Stop by and check it out when you’re touring downtown Marion, Kentucky. A collaborative project between The Crittenden Press, Marion Main Street, Inc., and the Crittenden County Historical Society is bringing history to life with virtual tours of some of Marion’s most unique and significant landmarks. See more of these short history vignettes on The Crittenden Press YouTube channel.

Regular online releases of virtual history tours around downtown Marion will continue through the early fall. Narrated by a handful of local personalities including longtime civic leader Susan Alexander, local historian Brenda Underdown, local entertainer Brennan Cruce and newspaper editor Chris Evans, these video vignettes are highlighting and preserving the community’s rich local history.

The project is being funded by Marion Main Street, Inc., which recently dissolved as a non-profit corporation. As its final gesture to the community, Main Street pledged the last of its resources to producing short historical videos chronicling landmarks in the community. These videos are archived on YouTube with links from various community website. Watch for them to go public this summer and fall at The Press Online, Crittenden Press YouTube Channel and MarionKentucky.org.

Fohs Hall available for rentals

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Marion's most stately building is available for rent. Several options are available including varying rates for profit- and non-profit organizations.

Rental space is available for small and large gatherings, including the Nunn and Conrad rooms, upstairs meeting area, basement and auditorium.

If you are planning a concert, party or reception, call Elliot West to reserve Fohs Hall.

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

School district issues statement about recent cases

In response to recent reports about two teenage individuals testing positive for COVID-19, the Crittenden County School District, which returned to in-person instruction on Tuesday, issued the following statement:

Yesterday, the Pennyrile Health Department shared positive reports in our county of school-aged children. It’s important to note, however, that these children have not yet attended in-person school, so our in-person learning will continue as planned. A reminder that when a positive in-person student or staff case is reported to Crittenden County Schools by the health department, we intend to close for one to two days to deep clean and sanitize, and that information will be shared with all families promptly. 

We wish to take this opportunity to thank all students and their families for making our #RocketRelaunch a success. At every school, students followed Healthy at School guidelines, following masking and social distancing protocols throughout the school day. This is a reflection of the preparation of parents and students to work together with us to keep all students and staff healthy and safe, and we extend our sincere thanks for that. Please continue to self-monitor your students for symptoms and encourage good hygiene. We are happy to have our Rockets back for the 20-21 school year, and, together, we hope to continue the year in the healthiest and safest way possible.

Two more COVID-19 cases announced today

updated 4:40pm 8/27/20

A spike in novel coronavirus cases continues in Crittenden County. Multiple cases, according to the contact tracing investigation, can be traced back to a church congregation, which has not been publicly named.

Today, the county received notice of two more confirmed cases, bringing its weekly total to 13. That is by far the most in a week’s time since records began being kept in March.

The latest two COVID-19 cases are a 39-year-old male and a 33-year-old female. Both are self-isolating at home. These are the 46th and 47th cases reported since pandemic conditions began in the spring. 

Despite a recent rise in cases, only one person has reportedly become sick enough to be hospitalized, and he was recently released from in-patient care.

Injury accident on Ky. 365 north of Marion

First responders were dispatched at about 1:15pm today to the scene of a single-vehicle injury accident on Ky. 365 north of Long Branch Road.

The vehicle had reportedly rolled over into a creek. 

EMS, rescue squad and law enforcement were sent to the scene along with first responders from Mattoon Fire Department. 

Motorists should temporarily avoid the area. 

Cairo Bridge over Ohio River has reopened

 The Cairo Bridge is reopened.

It reopens yesterday six days ahead of schedule.

The contractor has completed concrete resurfacing and levee maintenance work on a 2-mile section of the Kentucky approach, so the bridge was reopened to one-lane traffic.

The Ohio River bridge had been closed since August 1.  During the closure, commuters between Wickliffe and Cairo had to drive around on an 80-mile detour.  


Job Corps Center has openings

 

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Earl C. Job Corps Center is looking for employees.


The center has positions available in a number of departments. Competitive wages and benefits are provided.


For more information, contact the center.

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Confirmed COVID cases jump in past 6 days

Crittenden County has today confirmed six new cases of COVID-19, which makes 11 cases over the past six days and 45 since the pandemic began.

One person over the past week was initially hospitalized. No further update was available. 

The past week's total is by far the most in a single week's time since records began being kept in March. 

Crittenden has averaged 7.5 cases per month counting those reported today. Before the past week's confirmations, the average was just 5.6 per month.

Here are details of cases reported in the past six days in the order that they were reported: a 54-year-old male, a 45-year-old female, a 68-year-old male, a 45-year-old female, 75-year-old female, 17-year-old male, 40-year-old male, 67-year-old male, 65-year-old female, 49-yer-old female and a 14-year-old female. 

All were self-isolating at home while recovering except for a 68-year-old, who had symptoms bad enough that the individual sought treatment and was admitted to a regional hospital. That person has since been released from the hospital. 

Since March, everyone from Crittenden County who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 is either recovering or have recovered, except for one 59-year-old female who died in March.

Kentuckians can request mail-in ballot now

Now open is Kentucky's online portal to request a mail-in ballot for the November primary election.

Go to GoVoteKy.com and get ready to vote.

Many voting requirements and procedures have changed due to COVID-19. Stay tuned to The Crittenden Press for information about the coming election. 


Congressman has public forum for rural internet

Congressman James Comer has announced plans to host a virtual roundtable discussion on the important of ensuring broadband access on Thursday, August 27 at 11:00 am ET, 10:00 am CT. The discussion will take place online over Zoom and can be viewed by the public on Congressman Comer’s Facebook page.

The roundtable will provide an update to constituents from Congressman Comer on the need to expand broadband access, followed by a panel discussion with stakeholders to gather input and ideas on achieving those goals. The need to ensure digital access for all corners of Kentucky has only grown during the pandemic, at a time when many individuals have been forced to work and learn from home.

Panelists include industry-wide broadband leaders, along with leaders within the agriculture, education and healthcare sectors. The general public can view the discussion live on Congressman Comer’s Facebook page at facebook.com/CongressmanComer

Homestead auction is Saturday

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An auction will be held Aug. 27 to sell a mobile home on Ky. 297 in Crittenden County.

Homestead Auction Realty will conduct the sale beginning at 6 p.m.

The property is just over 1 acre and includes a detached garage.

For more information, contact Darrin Tabor at (270) 965-9999.

Back to School with COVID lacks chaos

When Crittenden County students went back to school this morning, hardly anyone knew exactly what to expect with new guidelines and protocols in place that are aimed at providing a safe return. The mission was almost certain to be cumbersome at the outset. 

Yet the return on Tuesday, for a first day of school since March, was near perfect. Lacking was chaos that some might have predicted.

Although lines were long in front of every school, traffic was kept moving with help from local law enforcement and school staff. Temperatures had to be checked before car riders got out of their vehicles and bus drivers and monitors took temps of those taking the traditional mode of transportation to school.

Wayne Winters, district transportation director, said no double routes were necessary as was at one time expected. He said everything went very well getting children to school on time. More than 800 students rode buses to campus under new COVID-19 pandemic rules.

Kara Turley, Crittenden County Middle School principal, agreed that the process of getting there went very well.

Now that children are in place for the first time since early spring, the challenge will be keeping them there. If the coming school days go as well as the district's initial arrival to campus, the school board chairman's desire may indeed be met. Chairman Chris Cook said a couple of weeks ago that he wants Crittenden County to be a "model" for other schools on how to return safely to the classroom. 

Monday, August 24, 2020

New traffic pattern begins Tuesday at CCES

 Morning drop-off and afternoon pickup with look differently Tuesday when classes resume at Crittenden Elementary School. 

In order to alleviate a backlog of traffic on Autumn Lane and around the circle in front of CCES, school administrators have reversed traffic flow. Instead of cars circling clockwise in front of the school, they will drive straight at the end of Autumn Lane and go behind the elementary school.

Temperature checks, one of the district's COVID-19 precautions, will be administered inside parent vehicles. 

To see exactly what the traffic pattern will look like, view this video prepared by Principal Jenni Gilkey.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Agr7Ttkr6_RsZeOZ1z4QFNANkFmG0oBS/view?usp=sharing  

Health Department offers online diabetes workshops

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Are you diabetic or do you know someone who is and could use some advice dealing with the disease?
The Pennyrile District Health Department offers assistance workshops accessible from a smartphone, tablet or computer.

The classes teach new diabetics and their family members how to eat properly, take medication and reduce risks of the disease.

To learn more, contact Kelly Dawes, diabetes education coordinator.

COVID case No. 39 confirmed here

Crittenden County has confirmed its 39th positive case of COVID-19 since records began being kept in March.

The latest case was announced this morning. It is a 75-year-old female who is self-isolating at home while recovering.


#LetThemPlay: Soccer among first to get started

Now that the KHSAA has approved fall sports to begin in September, The Crittenden Press will be publishing its annual preview for each team. 

Get a glimpse of what fans can expect from the Lady Rocket soccer team in this week's full edition of The Press.

This morning we were at soccer practice at the park and found the girls excited about their first day of official practice. 


Sunday, August 23, 2020

Expect traffic restrictions this week on Ledbetter bridge

A contractor for the Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative plans a daytime eastbound work zone lane restriction on the U.S. 60 Tennessee River Bridge at Ledbetter next week.

This eastbound work zone lane restriction is to allow the contractor to install utility lines along the bridge. This daytime work zone is expected to be established in about 500 ft. sections to facilitate the work at various locations along the bridge deck.

Eastbound motorists should be alert for one-lane traffic during daylight hours.  


Saturday, August 22, 2020

Rocket golfers capture All A regional crown

Crittenden County High School's golf team captured the All A Second Region Boys' Golf Tournament championship on Saturday at Hopkinsville Country Club.

Evan Belt finished the team's low score. 

It was the first small-school golf title for the CCHS squad since 2014.

See this week's full edition of The Crittenden Press for scores, highlights and more.

Friday, August 21, 2020

CP NewsTalk with CCHS Principal Amanda Irvan

BACK TO SCHOOL INFORMATION

CrittendenPress NewsTalk features a conversation with CCHS Principal Amanda Irvan about the start of the 2020 school year amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Partnering with The Crittenden Press in providing this valuable information from your local school is the Pennyrile District Health Department and its Diabetes Education Program. Allison Evans of The Crittenden Press is conducting this interview.

 

Salem Springlake offering new wages, now hiring

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Salem Springlake Health & Rehabilitation Center is hiring!

The long-term care facility is seeking Certified Nurse Aides. These positions are offered as full- and part-time and also PRN.

A new wage scale has been implemented for these positions as well.

To learn more, contact Salem Springlake.

Golfers tee off in All A Classic Saturday

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Crittenden County High School golfers will tee off tomorrow in the All A Classic First Region Golf Tournament at Hopkinsville Country Club.

The boys' team is led by senior Sam Greenwell, who shot a 77 in last year's regional event, finishing runner-up and qualifying for the State All A Tournament in which he finished eighth overall at 2-over-par.


Chamber seeks nomination for annual recognitions

Click List to View Previous Recipients
Know anyone who gives of his or her resources to the community without much fanfare or reward? Is there someone you see donating talents or time without any motivation other than to be helpful?

If so, here’s your opportunity to recognize them.

Crittenden County Chamber of Commerce has issued its call for nominations for the group’s annual awards which include Unsung Hero, Community Pride, Customer Service and Volunteer of the Year.

The group is also seeking suggestions for its Person of the Year honor.

Amy Collins, executive director of the civic organization, says the Person of the Year is the most coveted award the Chamber doles out annually. Its aim is to recognize a person whose outstanding leadership and community service over a period of time has made a positive and lasting impact on the area and its citizens. 

  • The Community Pride Award targets businesses or groups who have demonstrated pride in their community through improvements made to their own establishment or improvements to a public facility.
  • The Chamber’s Unsung Hero honors an individual who has made a difference in the community but has neither sought nor received public recognition. This award goes to a person who often works behind the scenes to improve the quality of life for others.
  • Volunteer of the Year is a tribute to an individual or individuals who performs community service on their own time without compensation.
  • The Customer Service Award identifies a individual who goes above and beyond normal demands of his or her job to provide extraordinary customer service. 

Nominations may be submitted via email to chamber@marionkentucky.us or provided in writing at the Chamber office at the Marion Welcome Center at Marion Commons.  You may also call Collins at 270-969-8618.

Deadline for nominations is Friday, Aug. 28. Selections will be made by Chamber directors and will be presented during the group’s annual Pumkin Festival on Sept. 26 in downtown area. Typically, the awards are presented during the group’s annual meeting in the spring. However, that event was cancelled due to COVID-19.



Thursday, August 20, 2020

Let's hear from CCES principal Jenni Gilkey

BACK TO SCHOOL INFORMATION

CrittendenPress NewsTalk features a conversation with CCES Principal Jenni Gilkey about the start of the 2020 school year amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Partnering with The Crittenden Press in providing this valuable information from your local school is the Pennyrile District Health Department and its Diabetes Education Program. Allison Evans of The Crittenden Press is conducting this interview.


KHSAA rules that fall sports will be played

The Kentucky High School Athletics Association (KHSAA) confirmed on Thursday during a virtual meeting of the Board of Control that fall sports will move ahead as planned with games starting in September.

The first formal, mandatory practices can begin on Monday, Aug. 24. Although many athletics teams have been holding workouts, those were limited in nature and could not be mandatory. 

For Crittenden County athletics, the KHSAA’s decision to stay on a schedule it initially proposed late last month means soccer, volleyball and cross country may begin competition on Sept. 7. Football can begin playing games on Sept. 11. 

Local school districts can set more restrictive measures if they choose.

The KHSAA’s decision today will require review by Gov. Andy Beshear, Kentucky Department of Health and the Kentucky Department of Education. 

Diabetes education classes offer assistance

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Are you diabetic or do you know someone who is and could use some advice dealing with the disease?

The Pennyrile District Health Department offers assistance workshops accessible from a smartphone, tablet or computer.

The classes teach new diabetics and their family members how to eat properly, take medication and reduce risks of the disease.

To learn more, contact Kelly Dawes, diabetes education coordinator.


New positive cases announced today

UPDATED

Crittenden County Judge-Executive Perry Newcom has announced today that the county has four new diagnosed cases of COVID-19.

This brings to 38 the total number of known cases here since March, an average of six per month. All individuals are either recovering or have recovered, except for one 59-year-old female who died in March.

The new cases are a 54-year-old male, a 45-year-old female, a 68-year-old male and a 45-year-old female. All are self-isolating at home. Two of the individuals reside at the same address. 


Southern Baptists breakdown Dem platform


By DAVID ROACH, Baptist Press

MILWAUKEE (BP) — The 2020 Democratic Party Platform draws mixed reviews when compared with resolutions passed by messengers at recent SBC annual meetings.


Adopted Tuesday (Aug. 18) by Democratic National Convention delegates, the 92-page platform runs contrary to many SBC resolutions, including convention statements on abortion and LGBT issues. But it aligns with many facets of SBC resolutions on racism, sexual abuse and mental health among other issues.


On yet other topics, the Democratic platform and SBC resolutions share common ground without aligning fully. Perhaps most notably, both groups endorse religious liberty, but the Democratic platform departs from the SBC by claiming religious liberty is not a valid reason for organizations to deny their employees LGBT protections or abortion services.


POINTS OF DISAGREEMENT

ABORTION

“Every woman should be able to access high-quality reproductive health care services, including safe and legal abortion,” according to the Democratic platform. Democrats stated their support for federal funding of Planned Parenthood, repeal of the Hyde Amendment (which bars federal funding for most abortions), overturning of the Mexico City Policy (which blocks federal funding for international abortions) and lifting restrictions on “medication abortion care.” Additionally, Democrats pledged to appoint U.S. Supreme Court justices who “enforce foundational precedents,” including the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion.


SBC resolutions have opposed abortion at least 25 times since 1976, including a 2015 “repudiation of the genocide of legalized abortion in the United States.” The SBC has called for defunding Planned Parenthood, repealing Roe v. Wade and halting use of the abortion drug RU 486. The convention has endorsed the Hyde Amendment, and the ERLC has applauded the Mexico City Policy.


LGBT ISSUES


The Democratic platform employs the acronym LGBTQ+ 32 times, an average of about once every three pages. Democrats advocate requiring federal health plans to cover CONTINUE READING

State highway 654 closed today

UPDATE: Highway is now reopened 


ORIGINAL POST

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet plans to close a section of highway Ky. 654 North in Crittenden County today.

 

It will  be closed at mile point 6.32 near Mount Zion Road in the Amish community to allow a cross drain to be replaced. 


Motorists on 654 will be able to access to Mt. Zion Church Road during the closure.


It will be closed until about 2:30pm.

 


Criders, Small Batch performing Friday night

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An outdoor concert by Marion residents Corey and Michelle Crider and their band Small Batch is set for Friday night at Mulligans Pizzeria & Pub.

Mulligans is located at Marion Golf & Pool on Blackburn Street in Marion.

A corn hole tournament and putting contest are on the agenda. Get a corn hole team together or form a team when you arrive and get registered before 7 p.m.

The Crider and Small Batch is a scaled down version of The Tapestry, which performs a blend of many genres of music and features the Criders as vocalists.



Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Nesbitt's buying gold and silver

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Nesbitt's Pawn Shop in Marion is buying gold and silver! Prices are high, so don't wait. Sell today.

Stop by Nesbitt's on Sturgis Road for a free estimate. 

The pawn shop is buying necklaces, rings and bracelets including unwanted or damaged jewelry.

The business also has more than 100 new and pre-owned guns in stock!

Join Our Virtual Tour of Marion Kentucky's History

  MARION MAIN STREET, INC.

CrittendenPress HistoryVignettes

A collaborative project between The Crittenden Press, Marion Main Street, Inc., and the Crittenden County Historical Society is bringing history to life with virtual tours of some of Marion’s most unique and significant landmarks. See these short history vignettes on YouTube.

Built in the American Four Corners style shortly following the end of the Civil War, this was a grand home erected by the J.H. Hillyard family, which owned a drug store in town. 

A highly-dignified home for its time, this structure is less than a block from today’s court square.

 Clement Nunn was one of the home’s occupants. He was a Kentucky state senator and appellate judge. Nunn married in 1894 Lemah Barnes, the daughter of the home’s owner. The couple later lived there themselves. The Nunns travelled extensively and brought back fine decorations for the home. They also modernized it with indoor plumbing and electricity in the early 20th century. 

Today, the former home at 217 West Bellville Street has been renovated and serves as a law office. 

Regular online releases of virtual history tours around downtown Marion will continue through the early fall. Narrated by a handful of local personalities including longtime civic leader Susan Alexander, local historian Brenda Underdown, local entertainer Brennan Cruce and newspaper editor Chris Evans, these video vignettes are highlighting and preserving the community’s rich local history.

The project is being funded by Marion Main Street, Inc., which recently dissolved as a non-profit corporation. As its final gesture to the community, Main Street pledged the last of its resources to producing short historical videos chronicling landmarks in the community. These videos are archived on YouTube with links from various community website. Watch for them to go public this summer and fall at The Press Online, Crittenden Press YouTube Channel and MarionKentucky.org.

Back to School COVID style

Crittenden County is one of fewer than 20 school districts across Kentucky that has opted for in-person schooling, as well as remote opportunities, during the coronavirus pandemic.

This week's full edition of The Crittenden Press includes five pages of information from the school district, its teachers, transportation coordinator and much more to get you and your student ready to go back to school in the traditional manner or learn from home.

Don't miss this issue that will be on sale today in print form in Marion or available with an online subscription. 

The Crittenden Press is your primary source of news and information for this community. We’re proud to serve our community and we take great pride in bringing you real news, sports reporting and other information that helps you know what’s going on in town and across the county. Help ensure that real reporting continues in this community by subscribing today. You can subscribe online to the full version of the newspaper for only $2.95 a month. Click here to subscribe.


Copyright 2020

The Crittenden Press

Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Property on Ky. 297 to be auctioned Aug. 27

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An auction will be held Aug. 27 to sell a mobile home on Ky. 297 in Crittenden County.

Homestead Auction Realty will conduct the sale beginning at 6 p.m.

The property is just over 1 acre and includes a detached garage.

For more information, contact Darrin Tabor at (270) 965-9999.



H&H Home &. Hardware hiring

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H&H Home & Hardware is searching for an experienced retail associate. 

Experience in hardware and home improvement is preferred.

To learn more about the full-time position, see Shanna.

H&H Home & Hardware is located in the former Pamida building on Sturgis Road across from Food Giant.

Grand jury indicts five individuals

The Crittenden County Grand Jury indicted five individuals, all men, on a variety of felony charges during its regular monthly deliberation process recently at the courthouse. 

A grand jury determines which cases are sent to circuit court for felony prosecution. 

The Crittenden Press provides monthly coverage of grand jury findings. 

This week's full edition of the newspaper will include that report.

The Crittenden Press is your primary source of news and information for this community. We’re proud to serve our community and we take great pride in bringing you real news, sports reporting and other information that helps you know what’s going on in town and across the county. Help ensure that real reporting continues in this community by subscribing today. You can subscribe online to the full version of the newspaper for only $2.95 a month. Click here to subscribe.


Copyright 2020

The Crittenden Press

Will water and sewer rates go up more?

Copyright 2020

The Crittenden Press

Marion City Council held its regular monthly meeting last night at city hall and among discussions were mounting financial problems caused by the pandemic on the town's water and sewer department. 

Rates have skyrocketed over the last couple of years as the city has worked to put its water and sewer department into financial position to upgrade the waste water system at a cost of about $13 million.

Now, COVID-19 is spreading through the business end of the water and sewer system. The alarm bells are going off and the city is starting to look for a cure. It might be painful.

See this week's printed edition of The Crittenden Press for details. 

Monday, August 17, 2020

Overweight? Good chance vaccine will do you no good

If you're obese, a coronavirus vaccine is probably less likely to immunize you, so now's a good time to start losing weight

Illustration by Lynne Shallcross, Kaiser Health News (Getty Images)
KY Health News
Looking forward to getting a vaccine for the novel coronavirus when it becomes available? If you're carrying around way too many pounds, it would be a good idea to lose some.

"Vaccines engineered to protect the public from influenza, hepatitis B, tetanus and rabies can be less effective in obese adults than in the general population, leaving them more vulnerable to infection and illness," Sarah Varney writes for Kaiser Health News. "There is little reason to believe, obesity researchers say, that covid-19 vaccines will be any different."

She quotes Raz Shaikh, an associate professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill: “Will we have a covid vaccine next year tailored to the obese? No way. Will it still work in the obese? Our prediction is no.”

Obese people are already among those more vulnerable to developing severe covid-19 from the virus, and that probably means they are also more vulnerable to dying from it.

>>Read more

Beware: Deanwood curve work on Tuesday


A contractor for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet plans a work zone lane restriction along Ky. 120 East of Marion in rural Crittenden County on Tuesday, August 18.

This work zone, at the 9 mile marker near the bridges over Sugar and Piney creeks, is to allow a high-traction coating to be added to the driving surface at the Deanwood curve.  

Motorists who travel this section of highway should be prepared to encounter one-lane traffic with alternating flow controlled by flaggers between approximately 8:30 a.m. until about 5 p.m.

Some traffic delays are likely during the movement and placement of equipment to facilitate this work.

Rite Temp seeking technician

 

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Rite Temp Heating & Air Condition, LLC is looking for an experienced technician.

Rite Temp services Crittenden and surrounding counties. Prospective employee must have valid driver's license and journeyman's card.

Some overtime expected. Company vehicle provided.

To learn more, call today.

Friday, August 14, 2020

Former educator Barnes dies unexpectedly

Former teacher, coach and administrator Kent Barnes died unexpectedly on Wednesday, Aug. 12. He was 69.

Barnes, who was retired and living in Michigan, taught at Murray and Crittenden County before moving to Michigan where he was a superintendent of schools in two districts over 19 years.

Although he'd been gone from Marion for more than 20 years, Barnes still maintained friendships here, including those with us at The Crittenden Press. 



 

County announces positive cases today

Crittenden County has announced today its 33rd and 34th COVID-19 cases.  

These are females, ages 40 and 42. Both are isolating at home.

Crittenden remains one of the commonwealth counties with the lowest rate of virus incidence. 

Auction Sept. 22 in Hopkins County

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An auction of 1,879 acres in Hopkins County will be conducted by Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc.

The property is being offered in 19 tracts and includes cropland, hunting and recreation land, potential timber investment and contiguous, productive, tillable land.

The property is located between Madisonville and Owensboro. However, the auction will be conducted at the Hopkins County Fairgrounds in Madisonville.

Inspection dates are Aug. 20, Aug. 29 and Sept. 9. For more information, contact Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc.


Thursday, August 13, 2020

Board of Education approves in-person schooling

After more than 30 minutes of discussion during a special called meeting Thursday evening, Crittenden County Board of Education voted unanimously to remain on course for an Aug. 25 start to the fall semester with a blend of in-person classes and remote learning.

School Board Chairman Chris Cook said the decision was based on “resounding” feedback from parents and the community. He said the local school district’s plans do not align with the current recommendation from the governor’s office, but believes the district can be a model for “how to return to school safely.”

A recent survey conducted by the school district found that about 78 percent of the parents of students supported in-person instruction. Remote learning options are available for students who do not wish to return to in-person schooling on Aug. 25.

Gov. Andy Beshear, the Kentucky Education Association and the Kentucky Department of Education had earlier this week recommended schools across the commonwealth delay a return to the classroom until Sept. 28. In response, a handful of Kentucky school districts, including Crittenden, have now indicated they will move forward with in-person education. 

Tonight's school board meeting was broadcast live on Facebook and more than 300 were watching.


Join Our History Tour of Marion Kentucky

 MARION MAIN STREET, INC.

CrittendenPress HistoryVignettes

A collaborative project between The Crittenden Press, Marion Main Street, Inc., and the Crittenden County Historical Society is bringing history to life with virtual tours of some of Marion’s most unique and significant landmarks. See these short history vignettes on YouTube.


The city’s oldest remaining church building is featured in this week’s tour of downtown Marion. 

Now used as a home for the Crittenden County Historical Museum, the structure was first occupied in 1881 by a Presbyterian USA congregation. 

The original brick exterior has held up remarkably well for almost 140 years. Its unique stained-glass windows were shipped to Marion from Germany. Other interesting features are the large exterior doors, hand-made balcony bannister and classroom doors with bevelled glass windows.

It was an active church until 2002 when it closed due to decreasing membership. As a museum, it’s home to serval rooms full of interesting items and documents. It’s open seasonally and there is no admission.


Regular online releases of virtual history tours around downtown Marion will continue through the early fall. Narrated by a handful of local personalities including longtime civic leader Susan Alexander, local historian Brenda Underdown, local entertainer Brennan Cruce and newspaper editor Chris Evans, these video vignettes are highlighting and preserving the community’s rich local history.

The project is being funded by Marion Main Street, Inc., which recently dissolved as a non-profit corporation. As its final gesture to the community, Main Street pledged the last of its resources to producing short historical videos chronicling landmarks in the community. These videos are archived on YouTube with links from various community website. Watch for them to go public this summer and fall at The Press Online, Crittenden Press YouTube Channel and MarionKentucky.org.

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

School board special COVID meeting

Crittenden County Board of Education will meet in special session at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 13 at Rocket Arena Conference Room. 

The primary purpose of the meeting will be to discuss local reaction to this week’s announcement by the governor with regard to in-person schooling.

Gov. Andy Beshear and the teachers’ union said in recent days that going back in person right now is a bad idea due to COVID-19 numbers across the state. In reaction to the governor’s comments on Monday, some schools that had planned a hybrid or in-person plan quickly pivoted to virtual learning. 

The governor has recommended that no one go back to school in person until Sept. 28; however, he said that was not an order.

Clark and the local school district's leadership team, has been planning for several weeks a return to the classroom on Aug. 25 for about three-quarters of the students enrolled in grades 1-12. About 25 percent of the students had indicated in a school survey that they would likely elect to begin with remote learning from home. 

The district had made arrangements for both in-person and remote learning. Clark said many hours of preparation had gone into the plan, supplies have been purchased and schools have been tailored to allow for social distancing.

There will also be a school board working session at 4:30pm so members can view a virtual forum being held by the Kentucky Board of Education. 

Growing Season Not Too Shabby

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released its crop production report today from the August Agricultural Yield Survey conducted at the beginning of the month. The report showed corn yields are expected to be up 7 percent from last year, soybeans 17 percent higher and burley tobacco yields down 5 percent.

“Crops are moving toward harvest in very good shape”, said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “Condition ratings have been running above average for much of the growing season. On August 1, corn and soybean conditions were 5 to 10 points above the 5-year average.”

Corn production in Kentucky is forecast at 259 million bushels, up 6% from the previous crop. Yield is estimated at 181 bushels per acre, up 12 bushels from the 2019 level. Acres for harvest as grain were estimated at 1.43 million acres, down 20,000 acres from 2019. The U.S. corn production is forecast at 15.3 billion bushels, up 12 % from 2019. Based on conditions as of August 1, yields are expected to average 181.8 bushels per acre, up 14.4 bushels from 2019. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 84.0 million acres, unchanged from the June forecast but up 3% from 2019.

Soybean production for Kentucky is forecast at 99.4 million bushels, an increase of 28% from 2019. Yield is estimated at 54.0 bushels per acre, up 8.0 bushels from a year ago. Acreage for harvest as

Sewer work next week along Main Street

The company that recently spent several months in Marion upgrading the city's sewer collection system will be back in town next week. 

Atkins says it will be doing followup work along Main Street between Gum Street and Liberty Fuels.

The work – which is part of the $2 million sewer upgrade – could last much of the week, but it's not expected to disrupt traffic or services.



County announces COVID-19 case No. 32

Crittenden County has announced its 32nd positive COVID-19 case.

This one is a 68-year-old male, who is self-isolated at home.

Crittenden ranks 106th out of Kentucky's 120 counties when it comes to the number of reported cases since records began begin kept in March.

COUNTIES WITH FEWEST CASES

  • Crittenden 32
  • Lyon  32
  • Trimble 32
  • Breathitt 31
  • Leslie  31
  • Morgan 30
  • Menifee 28
  • Estill 27
  • Nicholas 20
  • Wolfe  14
  • Owsley  12
  • Elliott  11
  • Lee 7
  • Robertson 3

Salem man charged after 2-county pursuit

Law enforcement departments from Crittenden and Livingston counties were involved in a pursuit shortly after dark Tuesday night that ended with a Salem man’s arrest on multiple charges, including possession of stolen handgun.

David Kirk, 51, is charged with three felonies for first-degree burglary, first-degree fleeing or evading police and first-degree wanton endangerment, plus reckless driving and other misdemeanors and traffic violations. Charges in Livingston County are pending.

The situation began around 8 p.m., when Crittenden County authorities were notified by a homeowner that his wireless home security system had captured an image of a shirtless man attempting to gain entry into his home on Frances Road in rural Crittenden County.

Crittenden County Deputy Chuck Hoover responded to the location and found that the homeowner had stopped the suspect in the driveway. At that point, Kirk drove away, failing to respond to the deputy’s commands to stop the vehicle. Deputy Hoover gave chase and the pursuit continued along Frances and Amos roads then onto Ky. 855 North before leaving Crittenden and entering Livingston at the end of Emmaus Church Road. 

Livingston authorities joined the pursuit on Cedar Grove Road where Deputy Michael Williams used a tactical maneuver to stop Kirk’s vehicle. The suspect fled on foot, but was eventually captured by Livingston Sheriff Bobby Davidson.  

Kirk was lodged in the Crittenden County Detention Center.



Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Board will meet to discuss back-to-school plans

Crittenden County Board of Education will meet in special session at 5:30pm Thursday in response to Gov. Andy Beshear's recommendation on Monday that in-school learning be suspended until Sept. 28.

Crittenden County schools were set for a mix of in-person instruction and remote learning with about 4-out-of-5 students opting to return to the classroom. Classes were to resume on Monday, Aug. 24.

Local Superintendent Vince Clark said today that the district is weighing its options. He also cited a number of concerns educators have with regard to children being away from school for too long.

Read more in this week's full version of The Crittenden Press, which will be available Wednesday about noon.


Reopening Schools? Superintendents Should Decide


COMMENTARY

By Kentucky Senators Wise, Stivers,

Givens, Thayer, Adams, and Wilson 

We, members of the Kentucky State Senate Majority, have heard a myriad of disappointment, anger, confusion, and frustration from our constituents regarding Governor Andy Beshear’s ‘recommendation’ that all schools open virtually in the fall of 2020. From parents of high school seniors to grandparents of kindergarten students, we are hearing from them all. 

 

Citizens across the Commonwealth know how vital schools are to their communities, as they play an essential role in preparing their children for the future. Some weeks ago, after sending a letter to the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) encouraging some guidance to be provided to schools, Governor Beshear’s KDE finally took a position. If districts worked with local health departments, school administrators, teachers, and community leaders to develop well-designed plans that fit their